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Your view on the Dutch 4.0 Creative Commons license translations.

August 19, 2014 in Featured, Licensing

In the end of 2013, Creative Commons released the latest version of their licenses: 4.0. These licenses are the result of an intensive public consultation that started in 2011. After the launch, Creative Commons Netherlands and Creative Commons Belgium started a translation to Dutch. Before these translations will be officially recognised, both parties are asking the public for feedback in Belgium and the Netherlands.

Creative Commons 4.0 logo

It’s imperative to have feedback on this new version of the Creative Commons licenses, because it’s essential for Creative Commons to offer licenses that everyone can easily read and understand. That’s why they need input from people who use the licenses. Having good and easy readable translations means a bigger reach and impact.

The public consultation runs until the 1st of September 2014. During and after this period, they’ll react to all the feedback and remarks that were given. After that, they’ll prepare a final proposal for Creative Commons international, where it will be reviewed for an official approval.

Participating in the public consultation is easy, look at the concept translations and tell them what you think about them. If you want to provide feedback on these concept translations but don’t know how this works in Google Docs: Follow this manual.

If you have any further questions about the way you can help Creative Commons, or have a general question about the 4.0 licenses, send and email to info@creativecommons.nl

Creative Commons Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License
Kalexanderson

Have a picture of the Atomium? Think twice before sharing!

July 4, 2014 in Featured, Licensing

So you have created a nice picture of a panorama in Belgium? Think twice before you share it. Copyright legislation in Belgium doesn’t allow you to share the picture: there is no freedom of panorama. Belgium where is This is why amongst others, if you look at the wikipedia page of the atomium, you will see a picture of the miniature version, not of the real thing.
Is this absurd? Obviously it is. Neelie Kroes however is calling for copyright reform and we wish to support this.
The atomium on wikipedia

The atomium on Wikipedia

On social media, our friends of Creative Commons Belgium have opened the discussion:
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